Poll Throws Cold Water on Biden’s Rural Tour

A New York Times and Siena College poll reveals President Joe Biden losing support in key swing states, raising doubts about the effectiveness of his rural tour.

President Joe Biden’s administration has been actively carrying out a rural barnstorm, aiming to win over voters in states that have historically leaned Republican. However, a recent poll conducted by The New York Times and Siena College has revealed that Biden is losing support in key swing states, including those where his administration has been focusing its efforts. This raises questions about the effectiveness of his rural tour and the impact it may have on his overall popularity.

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The Poll Results and Implications

The poll, which included swing states such as Wisconsin, Michigan, and Arizona, showed Biden trailing behind former President Donald Trump in Michigan and Arizona. Although he held a slight lead in Wisconsin, the results indicate that Biden’s rural strategy may not be resonating with voters in these states. This poses a challenge for Democrats who are trying to make inroads in rural counties that have traditionally voted Republican.

Democrats’ Perspective on Biden’s Rural Strategy

Democratic senators have weighed in on Biden’s rural strategy and offered their insights on how the administration can improve its outreach. Senate Agriculture Committee Chair Debbie Stabenow emphasized the need for Biden to highlight the administration’s efforts to support small towns and rural America, emphasizing job creation. Stabenow herself has successfully garnered support from rural communities in Michigan by connecting with them and delivering tangible results.

Senator Bob Casey, who is up for reelection in Pennsylvania, stressed the importance of highlighting the administration’s record of investments in rural communities. He emphasized the need for Biden to visit these areas not only to talk about his achievements but also to listen and respond to the needs of the people.

The Farm Bill Extension

All four agricultural leaders, including Stabenow, Senator John Boozman, and Representatives G.T. Thompson and David Scott, have acknowledged the need for an extension of the 2018 farm bill. While the 2018 bill technically lapsed in October, the true deadline for action is January 1, when several major programs will revert to permanent law. Thompson, the chair of the House Agriculture Committee, still plans to pass a House farm bill in December but acknowledges the necessity of an extension as a temporary solution until the Senate completes its work on the farm bill.

The House Appropriations Agriculture-Food and Drug Administration Bill

Representative Andy Harris, the chair of the House Appropriations Agriculture-Food and Drug Administration subpanel, has suggested that the bill should not receive another vote on the House floor. Instead, Harris believes that House Republicans should move directly into conference with the Senate to work out any differences. This position diverges from Speaker Mike Johnson’s plan to pass all 12 appropriations bills on the House floor. Harris’s perspective reflects the challenges caused by a rider to block mail-delivery of the abortion pill mifepristone nationwide, which has created a rift and hindered repairs to the House bill.

Conclusion: The recent poll results indicating a decline in support for President Biden in key swing states highlight the challenges of his rural tour. While Democrats are trying to make inroads in traditionally Republican rural counties, the poll raises doubts about the effectiveness of this strategy. It is clear that Biden and his administration need to find ways to better connect with rural voters and emphasize their efforts to support small towns and rural America. Additionally, the need for a farm bill extension and the challenges surrounding the House Appropriations Agriculture-Food and Drug Administration bill further complicate the administration’s rural agenda. As Biden continues his rural tour, he must address these challenges head-on to regain the support of rural voters and achieve his goals for rural America.

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